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Turbine Tools 4.0c Detailed Explanation

Turbine Tools 4.0c will do a number of things that no other software program or laser system can do.

1. Calculate two different standard lines of bearing moves.

2. Optimize each of those lines using proposed moves to find the best balance of bearing moves and acceptable alignment.

3. Calculate any number of custom lines for particular situations.

4. Optimize those custom lines with proposed moves to find the best possible combination of bearing moves.

5. Present the option of choosing from among several different acceptable lines of bearing moves to best solve any situation.

6. Save time and money on Single Coupling Alignment by allowing any combination of 4 bearings to be moved to align the one coupling.

7. Save time and money on the complete turbine alignment process by unifying the coupling alignment and the internal alignment.


Actual Procedure

1. First, enter the data then simply click a button to calculate 2 different standard lines of bearing moves, either one of which will align all couplings to exact desired coupling readings.

2. Then each of these standard lines can be optimized by entering proposed moves on any or all of the bearings and instantly seeing the results of the proposed moves on the desired coupling readings. Proposed bearing moves can be quickly found which align all couplings within tolerance while requiring smaller moves on fewer bearings than the standard lines. This can save considerable time and money. The resulting coupling readings are displayed graphically, numerically, and as relative positions.

3. Then it is also possible to enter complete custom alignment requirements by specifying which bearings to move or not move to align each coupling.

Example 1: Perhaps the most obvious example of custom alignment is when it is desired to not move the generator. To do this you simply specify that the generator is not to be moved and the other bearing moves will be calculated to align the couplings.

Example 2: Another case which can save considerable time is when it is possible to move 2 bearings to align 2 couplings within tolerance.
For example, after running initial standard lines it is seen that the desired moves at T5 and T6 to align B coupling are close to the desired moves at T5 and T6 to align C coupling.
Thus it may be possible to move T5 and T6 to align both B and C within tolerance.
You would then specify that you do not need to move T3, T4 or T7, T8. This would change B and C which you don't want to do.
Then you would run program to move the other bearings to align all the couplings. This could obviously save up to 4 bearing moves.

Example 3: The C coupling alignment in the middle of the train is good as is but the other couplings need to be aligned.
You would then specify that you do not want to move T5, T6, T7, T8 and this will keep C as is.
Then run the program to move the other bearings to align the other couplings.

Example 4: The LP turbine section has not been disassembled and thus it is desired that the T5 and T6 bearings not be moved. Simply specify to not move those bearings and the other bearings will be moved to align the couplings.

Example 5: Turbine Tools 4.0 is also very adaptable to any situation.
One unit's history might be that it has always run well with the C coupling face off an amount larger than tolerance, but it is necessary that the B rim reading be exactly on the money. While another unit may have the opposite case.
The optimum line of bearing moves for these units would be different and Turbine Tools 4.0 can quickly find the best line for each unit.

Once again, any of the above custom lines can also be further optimized by entering proposed moves and seeing the resulting coupling alignments instantly. This can further eliminate or decrease the required bearing moves.

And finally, Turbine Tools 4.0 can also be used along with internal alignment to save time and money during the outage by unifying the coupling alignment and the internal alignment.
Disassembly coupling alignment readings can be taken and then used to determine the required bearing moves. These bearing moves can then be used to determine what will be the new rotor positions. And the rotor positions can be used to determine the proper internal alignments.
This will avoid the not unusual situation at reassembly where bearing moves for coupling alignment create the need to then also realign seals or shells. Actual Field Cases


On one typical field case the initial standard line indicated it would be necessary to move 8 bearings with the largest move .027.
By running the proposed move optimization, in a few minutes it was found that all couplings could be aligned within tolerance by moving only 5 bearings with the largest move .016.
The program quickly found a way to save the time required to make 3 bearing moves.

On another field alignment situation, it was definitely desired to not move the generator, but all couplings were out of alignment.
At first it looked like it would be necessary to move at least one bearing 0.045 up if the generator was not moved. A 0.045 bearing move would require moving packing, shells, diaphragms etc.
By using Turbine Tools 4.0 it was possible in a few minutes to find at least 4 good valid lines that would align all couplings within tolerance and not require moving the generator or any shells or packing, and with the largest bearing move 0.018.
It was then possible to choose the best of these 4 lines of bearing moves to balance fewer bearing moves with closest coupling alignment within tolerance.
Considerable time and money was saved by eliminating the generator move and or moves to packing boxes and shells.

Another case demonstarted how the multiple shaft program can also save time and money on any single coupling alignment by allowing moves to be made on any combination of 4 bearings to align the one coupling.
On a recent outage the T1 and T2 bearings were being moved to align the A coupling. This presented the not unusual case where a large move down was required at T1 to align the A coupling face which was open at the bottom. A move of 0.030 down was required at T1 which would necessitate also moving the control rotor and oil pump.
It could be seen that a slight move up at T3 would help, but with a single coupling alignment program there is no good way to calculate exactly how much.
With Turbine Tools 4.0 it could be quickly calculated that a move up at T3 of 0.003 and a move down at T1 of 0.019, and with no move on the T2 bearing, would align the A coupling within half a mil on the face and would not require a move on the oil pump and front standard.

Centerline Software

Email: service@turbinetools.com

Centerline Software LLC
2438 Industrial Blvd #146
Abilene, TX 79605

Phone: 325-691-0970